Have You Been Charged With Robbery?

Representation from a Skilled Chicago Criminal Defense Lawyer

Have you been accused of robbery? If so, then I invite you to contact my firm, Hallock Law, today. Unlike other theft offenses, robbery implies that there was an element of violence involved with the incident and prosecutors aggressively pursue convictions in these cases. I have dedicated my firm to the unflagging advocacy of those who have been accused of breaking the law. Time and time again, I have ensured that my clients are perceived in the proper light—both in and out of court—and have placed reductions and dismissals within reach on their behalf.

Start the defense process today. Contact me for a free consultation.

Robbery Charges in Illinois

Chicago robbery charges are prosecuted under Illinois statutes 720 ILCS 5/18-1 and 720 ILCS 5/18-2. Here, they are categorized into three different offenses.

Robbery charges in Illinois include:

  • Robbery: the taking of property "by the use of force or by threatening the imminent use of force."
  • Aggravated robbery: robbery in which the accused suggests that they have weapon or have administered drugs to victim without their consent.
  • Armed robbery: robbery in which dangerous weapons or firearms were used.

Robbery is always considered a felony and can come with harsh prison sentences. For more information on what specific penalties you could be facing and how my firm can help you counter these charges, contact me today. As a dedicated Chicago criminal defense attorney, I have committed my career to the incisive legal representation and protection of those who need their voices heard before the justice system.

You do not have to be just another case number. Call me for the individualized attention and service you deserve.

HELPFUL TIPS FROM ME TO YOU

HOW TO PROPERLY EXERCISE YOUR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS

What You Should Do

  • Be respectful at all times.
  • Calmly record the interaction.
  • Ask if you are free to leave. If you do not ask, the officer may think—and the judge may agree—that the interaction was consensual.
  • If you are free to leave, go! If you are not free to leave, respectfully but firmly ask to speak with your lawyer.

What You Should Not Do

  • Do not physically resist arrest.
  • Do not become aggressive or confrontational.
  • Do not consent to a search. The Constitution does not apply if you consent.
  • Do not answer questions without first speaking with your attorney. Police are allowed to hold you for 48 hours and they may lie to you the entire time.

Hallock Law is ready to help you 24/7!

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