Chicago Probation Violations

Call a Skilled Criminal Defense Lawyer in Chicago

Probation violations are common and occur for many reasons. Probation violations range from minor events like accidentally missing a scheduled meeting to major events like being charged with a new crime.

If you violate the terms of probation, you can face the following:

  • Prison time to serve out the remainder of the sentence
  • Additional charges and a longer sentence
  • No chance of probation in the future

Unlike the government's burden of proof at trial, which is "beyond a reasonable doubt," the government's burden at a probation violation hearing is a "preponderance of the evidence." This means the government needs to prove only that it was more likely than not that the defendant violated his or her probation. Go into this hearing with confidence; retain legal representation for your case as soon as possible.

Contact Hallock Law at 888-570-7899

If the judge believes you violated your probation, he or she may sentence you to whatever punishment was available when probation was first imposed. It is imperative that you retain legal representation. Throughout my career as a Chicago criminal defense attorney, I have been dedicated to providing passionate counsel because I know and understand the experience you are enduring.

I can work with you to show the court that you did not violate the terms of your probation. Whether through negotiations or trial, I stand committed to helping you obtain favorable results and a second chance. Don’t hesitate; my firm is readily available to guide you through the process. Probation violation can result in serious penalties with which you will not want to deal, and my legal counsel can be the difference in success and failure.

Contact Thomas C. Hallock if you need a skilled and committed probation violation defense attorney in Chicago. Call to schedule your free consultation today.

HELPFUL TIPS FROM ME TO YOU

HOW TO PROPERLY EXERCISE YOUR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS

What You Should Do

  • Be respectful at all times.
  • Calmly record the interaction.
  • Ask if you are free to leave. If you do not ask, the officer may think—and the judge may agree—that the interaction was consensual.
  • If you are free to leave, go! If you are not free to leave, respectfully but firmly ask to speak with your lawyer.

What You Should Not Do

  • Do not physically resist arrest.
  • Do not become aggressive or confrontational.
  • Do not consent to a search. The Constitution does not apply if you consent.
  • Do not answer questions without first speaking with your attorney. Police are allowed to hold you for 48 hours and they may lie to you the entire time.

Hallock Law is ready to help you 24/7!

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